Fluoroscopy

Fluoroscopy is an advanced type of X-ray imaging. During a fluoroscopy procedure, X-rays are passed through the body, and the image is transmitted to a monitor producing a moving, real time image. In some cases, a contrast agent is used to enhance the details of the image.

Fluoroscopy is used for a variety of diagnostic and treatments options, including:

  • Evaluation of the gastrointestinal tract
  • Joint injections for pain relief or contrast administration prior to CT or MRI imaging
  • Evaluation of the urinary tract
  • Kyphoplasty/vertebroplasty
  • Lumbar puncture
  • Injection of contrast in the spinal canal prior to CT or MRI imaging (myelography)
  • Assist with speech therapy swallow studies

How Is a Fluoroscopy Procedure Performed?

Fluoroscopy procedures are minimally invasive. The length of the study varies with the type of procedure being performed. Following the exam, you can return to your normal activities.

The typical fluoroscopy procedure includes:

  • Changing into a hospital gown
  • Receiving contrast agent by mouth, rectum, urethra, or injection, if necessary
  • Relaxing on the exam table (You may be asked to change position multiple times throughout the examination in order to adequately image the body part being evaluated.)
  • The specialized X-ray equipment is positioned above the area to be scanned, and the X-ray images are displayed on a computer monitor.

Preparing for Your Fluoroscopy Procedure

Minimal preparation is required prior to your procedure. Preparations are designed to minimize interactions with the contrast agent, and include the following:

  • Please refrain from normal eating and drinking prior to your scan if the gastrointestinal tract is being evaluated.
  • If the colon is being evaluated, ensure that you follow the provided colon preparation instructions prior to arriving for your examination.
  • Please remove any metal objects such glasses, jewelry, or hearing aids.
  • Women should always inform their technologist if there is any possibility of pregnancy.
  • Please inform us if you have experienced a reaction to contrast agents in the past.